Ordinance or law coverage definition

You may have heard of the term ordinance or law coverage in relation to commercial property insurance, but many people are unaware that this type of coverage can also be a part of your homeowners insurance policy. Ordinance or law insurance covers the cost to rebuild a home that has been destroyed, as well as the cost to upgrade a home so that it meets the most up-to-date building codes after a covered loss. 

Do I need ordinance or law coverage?

For the safety of those living in your home, it’s important to stay up to date on any code changes pertaining to weather, fire safety, plumbing, wiring, and handicap accessibility. Paying out of pocket for renovations to comply with new mandatory state codes can be costly. With an ordinance or law coverage policy, you are covered for upgrading your home based on any state mandated criteria.

Types of coverages

There are three types of coverages that fall under ordinance or law insurance:

  1. Cost to upgrade: In the event your home is fully or partially destroyed by a covered loss event, ordinance or law coverage will help to cover the costs of updating your house to ensure it meets current building codes. 
  2. Rebuilding expenses: If your home needs to be replaced, repaired or upgraded after a loss, ordinance or law insurance will help pay for the efforts needed to meet current building laws or ordinances.

How ordinance or law coverage works

In order to determine if you need ordinance or law coverage, consider the age of your home. If you live in an older home and experience a loss, for instance, you may be more likely to have to upgrade to current building codes compared to living in a newer home that already meets up-to-date requirements. 

Learn more about different types of homeowners insurance coverages today to decide what’s best for you.

Product, coverage, discounts, insurance terms, definitions, and other descriptions are intended for informational purposes only and do not in any way replace or modify the definitions and information contained in your individual insurance contracts, policies, and/or declaration pages from Nationwide-affiliated underwriting companies, which are controlling. Such products, coverages, terms, and discounts may vary by state and exclusions may apply.